Author Archive | John Beans

AltimeterThree is Chute Release-aware

For model rocket enthusiasts who use Chute Release, the latest version of the AltimeterThree app now calculates descent rate before and after Chute Release opens. So now you can measure the rocket’s tumble (or drogue) descent rate, then the final landing speed. To update your app to the latest version, go into the app store […]

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User Testing of Chute Release

Tom Disch of WOOSH (Wisconsin Organization of Space Hobbyists) conducted a number of real-world tests of Chute Release, and wrote a great article in his club’s newsletter. WOOSH Newsletter May/June 2016    

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Using Chute Release at High Elevation

If you launch rockets at a location with high elevation, such as some areas in Colorado and Utah, and your Chute Release has version 1.1 firmware on it, you should send it to us to update the firmware. For most people, this will not matter. Chute Release doesn’t care how high your flights go, but […]

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Chute Release Test Flights (with updates)

(If you haven’t done so already, please read our earlier posts introducing this upcoming product.) As flight testing of Chute Release has gotten underway, I wanted to begin sharing early results. Here’s a look from a flight today in California. Other test sites include Minnesota, Colorado, and Washington. For our setup, we used an Estes Leviathan flying […]

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How to Operate Chute Release

As flight testing begins, the user interface for Chute Release has arrived at what we think will be the final version. We’ll see how well it works out during actual usage. Let’s take a look at a pre-production copy of Chute Release (the final will look much more polished). The LEDs are quite bright, because […]

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Chute Release for Rocketry Ready for Testing

Those of you who have heard me talk at the National Association of Rocketry annual meetings know that Jolly Logic has been developing a parachute deployment product for model rocketry which gives you control over when your parachute opens. (If you are into rocketry and you’re curious about what we’re working on, the most recent talk […]

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AltimeterThree’s Glider Mode Put to the Test

Aris Kosmides is an avid RC flyer in Thessaloniki, Greece. He was curious to see how well AltimeterThree would perform in his gliders, and here’s his report on his experiences. AltimeterThree by Jolly Logic This new gadget is a very interesting tool for RC enthusiasts. I had the chance to test the unit, and I […]

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Reliable AltimeterThree Connections

If you begin to suddenly have trouble connecting to AltimeterThree from your phone—or downloading flights—it may be because your battery is low. It’s a good idea to keep your altimeter fully charged, and that goes for any product you might have that uses a rechargeable lithium battery. Lithium batteries like to be kept fully charged, […]

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AltimeterTwo Version 4.1

AltimeterTwo Version 4.0 Enhances Ejection Detection

AltimeterTwo is great for automatically analyzing rocket flights. But there have been situations where it mistakenly thought that parachute ejection occurred right as the motor stopped firing. For most rockets, this situation was not encountered. But if your rocket naturally decelerates very rapidly after burnout—because of the right combination of large diameter, high drag, or […]

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How AltimeterThree Influenced Last Year’s Designs

When we updated AltimeterOne and AltimeterTwo in 2014, a few changes were obvious improvements: But what was somewhat surprising (for those who appreciate our emphasis on keeping things small) is that the products were slightly LARGER than their predecessors. Why was this? The reason is that the products were to share their form factor with the […]

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